1.  
RB  OAK
Rush Att
255
Rush Yds
1061
Rush TD
8
Rush Avg
4.2
Rec
39
Rec Yds
333
Rec TD
1
Rec Avg
8.5
The first running back off the board in the 2019 draft, Jacobs landed in a potential starting role when Oakland nabbed him with the 24th overall pick. While he didn't carry a heavy workload in a crowded Alabama backfield during his college days, he impressed with what chances he got, showing a versatile skill set and running with power and purpose. At 5-10, 220, Jacobs runs with a low center of gravity, and he should see plenty of short-yardage and goal-line carries regardless of his other duties in the Oakland backfield. His balance and vision are also pluses, so while he lacks elusiveness and there are questions about his ability to outrun defenders in the open field, Jacobs can still pick up extra yards after the initial point of contact. He also showed enough as a receiver to stay on the field for passing downs, though he might never be a true difference-maker through the air and Jalen Richard will also be a factor in that area. The club signed Isaiah Crowell this offseason, but the former Brown and Jet quickly took himself out of the picture with a torn Achilles during April workouts. Marshawn Lynch retired, and the Raiders otherwise focused on upgrading their passing game with the additions of Antonio Brown and Tyrell Williams, leaving Jacobs to spearhead the rushing attack.
2.  
RB  CHI
Rush Att
191
Rush Yds
810
Rush TD
6
Rush Avg
4.2
Rec
37
Rec Yds
280
Rec TD
1
Rec Avg
7.6
A 2019 third-round pick out of Iowa State, Montgomery steps into an immediate competition with free-agent signee Mike Davis for a significant role in the Chicago backfield alongside Tarik Cohen. Montgomery's most impressive traits as a runner are his vision, patience and power, as he calmly lets holes develop before throttling up to get to the second level. He ran just a 4.63 in the 40-yard dash, but he has enough wiggle to make the first tackler miss, and he can generate yards after contact with a stout frame, bringing a low center of gravity and powerful leg drive. He's also competent as a receiver and already adept as a pass protector, giving him the ability to stay on the field for three downs, even if his targets will be limited by Cohen's presence. There are concerns about Montgomery's college workload and the punishment his running style creates, but he's essentially a more versatile version of Jordan Howard, so he likely will have an opportunity to thrive in the same role focused on early downs and short-yardage carries.
3.  
RB  PHI
Rush Att
111
Rush Yds
493
Rush TD
3
Rush Avg
4.4
Rec
34
Rec Yds
239
Rec TD
0
Rec Avg
7.0
Sanders only got a chance to start for one year at Penn State after Saquon Barkley left, showing enough in his final collegiate season to get drafted in the second round in 2019. A smooth, natural runner, Sanders doesn't flash any elite traits but at least shows above-average elusiveness, balance and vision, allowing him to navigate traffic and get to the second level with consistency. He can also contribute in the passing game. At 5-11, 211, Sanders doesn't display a lot of power or burst, and, according to scouts, can dance too much in the backfield, a habit he'll need to break quickly to thrive in the NFL. Sanders joins an Eagles backfield now topped by former Bears bulldozer Jordan Howard, along with holdovers Josh Adams, Wendell Smallwood and Corey Clement. Given the competition, the rookie needs to make a strong impression in camp to avoid being buried on the depth chart. Assuming he holds his own, Sanders could provide an effective complement to Howard, ceding short-yardage carries to the bruiser but making a strong case for regular work in other situations. Running behind an excellent offensive line as part of a potent offense, Sanders could put up useful numbers even without an official starting role.
4.  
WR  KC
Rec
47
Rec Yds
615
Rec TD
5
Rec Avg
13.1
Rush Att
0
Rush Yds
0
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
0.0
With Tyreek Hill likely getting himself suspended or banned from the league, the Chiefs used the 56th overall pick to nab a player with similar physical specs. At 5-11, 183, and running a blistering 4.33 40, Hardman's one of the fastest receivers in the rookie class and should immediately find himself as the team's new field stretcher, an especially valuable role given Patrick Mahomes' other-worldly arm. Hardman was a five-star athlete coming out of high school, starting his career at cornerback before switching to receiver. He might be a little raw, but he didn't turn 21 until March and has plenty of room to grow as a player. Sammy Watkins should be the team's top wideout, and Travis Kelce among the league's most targeted tight ends, but beyond those two ­­- and Watkins has an extensive injury history - there isn't any established depth.
5.  
QB  ARI
Pass Att
490
Pass Yds
3561
Pass TD
21
Pass Int
9
YPA
7.3
Rush Att
97
Rush Yds
544
Rush TD
5
Rush Avg
5.6
The Cardinals are all in on Kyler Murray. They made the Heisman Trophy winner this year's top draft pick and already named him the starter. New coach Kliff Kingsbury said he'll tailor his air raid offense around Murray, who shouldn't face too steep of a learning curve after he excelled in Oklahoma's spread attack, joining Deshaun Watson as the only quarterbacks in FBS history with 4,000 passing yards and 1,000 rushing yards in a season. Murray has a strong arm, quick release and first-rate elusiveness - he was sacked on just 4.5 percent of his dropbacks last season. Height is his only issue, but it's a big one. At 5-10 1/8, he's the shortest quarterback drafted in the first round since 1953. He's also shorter than Russell Wilson, who despite all his success has trouble seeing over linemen at times. The Cardinals are betting that, like Wilson, Murray can overcome it with exceptional athleticism - he was picked ninth overall in the 2018 MLB Draft - and instinctive playmaking skills. He'll be surrounded by physically gifted receivers with spread-offense experience. Second-round pick Andy Isabella ran a 4.31 40 at the combine, fourth-round pick Hakeem Butler is 6-5, second-year WR Christian Kirk played in the air raid at Texas Tech, and the team even signed oft-injured West Virginia product Kevin White. Murray also has Larry Fitzgerald working the slot and an excellent receiver out of the backfield in David Johnson. The biggest question is how well the air raid offense will work in the NFL.
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